So You’ve Been Hurt at Work…Will You Be Eligible to Receive Workers’ Compensation?

Usually, when people think about on-the-job injuries, they picture hazardous jobs such as construction work. It is easy to imagine that people with dangerous jobs could be hurt at work, doing intense physical work at great heights or in tight quarters. What is just as common, however, is that people with regular, “everyday” jobs get injured while working all the time.

Regardless of where you work—from a desk to a welder’s bench—workers’ compensation is designed to protect you after an injury that you sustained on the job. Workers’ compensation can help you pay for your medical bills from injuries stemming from accidents to illnesses related to your work conditions, as well as help you (and your family) get by until you can return to work.

But workers’ compensation doesn’t cover every incident in the workplace. While many injuries are covered, it’s important to know that some are not.

What Workers’ Compensation Cannot Cover

Workers’ compensation is meant to protect you in the event that you are injured while performing your duties under the scope of employment. In simpler terms, you must have sustained your injury while doing something listed in your job description. If you slip and fall in the hallway of your office while you are at work, your injury is likely going to be covered. If you are in a car accident while on your lunch break, however, it probably will not be covered.

Another important consideration is the extent of your injuries. Generally, if simple first aid treatment was enough to patch you up, you will not be covered. Another consideration is any preexisting conditions you may have; if you had an old knee injury and you hurt your ankle at work, workers’ compensation will cover only your ankle injury.

Injuries caused by your own willful misconduct, horseplay, or intoxication are also unlikely to be covered by workers’ compensation benefits.

If you have been hurt at work, it can be confusing to figure out whether you are eligible for workers’ compensation, especially if your employer insists that you are not covered. If you have questions about your coverage and eligibility, reach out to us today to discuss your case. Simply click on the live chat feature to be connected with us now!
 

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