I often see trucks that have been pulled over—what is going on in these stops?

When we see cars pulled over by police officers, it is usually a safe bet to assume that the driver was speeding or in violation of a traffic law. When it comes to the trucks that you see getting pulled over, however, the reasons may be different.

Department of Transportation Roadside Truck Inspections Keep Everyone Safe

Many of the stops you are observing are being conducted by Department of Transportation inspectors, and are for the purpose of inspections. There are several levels of DOT inspections, but commonly there will be three different types performed:

  • The simplest level of inspection takes a thorough look at the driver’s paperwork. As you may know, truck drivers have several important documents with them at all times, including their CDL, their medical information, and their logbooks. Logbooks must be current up through the driver’s last change of duty status, and DOT inspectors often catch drivers that may be a few hours off in their logs.
  • The next level of inspection involves the driver’s paperwork as well as documents for the truck, trailer, and load. Commercial vehicles have strict requirements involving maintenance, insurance, registration, inspections, load restrictions, and other safety issues, so inspectors look to make sure everything is up to date and meets all regulations.
  • The most complex inspections involve a 37-point physical inspection of the truck, trailer, and load in addition to vehicle and driver documents. Inspectors will look at all critical systems on the truck and trailer, including brakes, tires, lights, the engine, and the frame.

If a truck driver (or the truck, trailer, or load) is found to be in violation, the driver may be fined, or the truck may be taken out of service until the problem is amended. DOT inspectors are notoriously thorough, and these roadside inspections go a long way to ensure that the trucks you share the road with are safe.

International Roadcheck Brought Attention to Cargo Safety

For nearly three decades, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance has taken DOT inspections to the next level each year with a 72-hour inspection event. This year’s International Roadcheck occurred June 2-4, and with 10,000 CVSA-certified inspectors, an average of 17 trucks and buses throughout the U.S., Canada, and Mexico were inspected each minute for compliance.

This year’s Roadcheck focused on cargo securement, an issue that has caused several dangerous truck accidents. Truck drivers are required to ensure that their loads are properly loaded and tied down, both before starting a trip and periodically throughout the trip.

If you have been hurt in a truck accident, an experienced truck accident attorney can help you find out if the driver or vehicle was in violation of the strict safety standards required to keep you safe. Contact Augusta truck accident attorney Chris Hudson today if you have been injured in a Georgia or South Carolina truck accident; call his office today or fill out the online contact form to schedule your free consultation now.