How can I prove that the truck that hit me was speeding when we crashed?

After any type of accident, there is a standard protocol that most people follow. Typically, you move your cars from the road, exchange insurance information with the other driver, and seek information from possible witnesses. If the accident was serious enough, the police may come and write a report based on the accounts of both drivers as well as witnesses.

Despite all of this information, even the simplest accidents can take time to investigate and to assign liability appropriately. For more serious accidents—including most truck accidents—the investigation must go even further to determine cause and liability.

How Can You Prove That Speed Was a Factor in a Truck Accident?

In any accident, proving liability is very difficult unless the cause of the accident was extremely obvious, such as someone going the wrong way down the highway. Even if you had dozens of witness statements and police reports, none of them serve as definitive proof in the investigation.

Fortunately, if you are involved in a truck accident, you may have one very solid piece of proof that you can rely on, provided you act quickly to ensure that it is preserved. Just as the “black box” is always the first place investigators look to find out what caused a plane crash, many trucks are equipped with similar equipment. Known as "event data recorders", these devices capture the truck’s speed as well as other information such as what position the brake and gas pedals were in at the time of the crash. Similar to aircraft black boxes, event data recorders are set to record on a loop and will delete itself over a set period of time.

Attorney Chris Hudson is an experienced trial lawyer well versed in handling truck accident cases. If you were involved in, or injured as a result of, a crash with a commercial truck and believe that speed may have been a factor, call our offices today for a free, no-obligation consultation. From our offices in Augusta we’re proud to serve all of Georgia and South Carolina.